lcwb

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Month: December, 2011

Running to the other side of infinity

I ran to the other side of

Infinity,

only to find that I was

Alone.

I would have

Turned around and

laughed-

But with nobody around,

things just aren’t

as funny.

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Thank you Kelly Clarkson

I ran to the other side of infinity, then turned around, and laughed back at it.

This post is about evolution. Changes take place when you least expect them to, and regardless of what/how they enhance or disturb  your life, changes create who you are by how you respond to them.

Looking back at my semester, one could easily think it was a decently shitty semester for me. I did the whole ‘get lost in a relationship’ thing and ‘sacrifice your own happiness for person X’ thing and basically sold my soul to the love devil… or at least a ‘love devil’ impersonator (…WHAT IS LOVE!? AHH). And then, as per literary tradition, the devil turned his back on me and left me in what I thought would be the total shitty, insurmountable dust. –And it was shitty, but not insurmountable. One could look at the fact that I spent half of the semester in a cave listening to ‘Since you been gone’ by Kelly Clarkson and think, wow, that must have sucked– because it did. Kelly Clarkson on repeat is really an all time low. But what nobody will realize, except for me, is that this past semester has probably been one of the best semesters of my life, specifically because of how I chose to respond to an otherwise crappy situation. How one responds to life is what matters. Any kind of hardship (not just whiny, college-girl love problems) can be overcome in a way that makes the struggling individual better.

As obnoxious as it is, Kelly Clarkson is right: —Thanks to you , now I get what I want. But if you’re a little too snobby for Kelly, Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote an equally fitting piece: ‘Every wall is a door.’

 

-LCWB.

‘Walking Through a Wall’, by Louis Jenkins.

Unlike flying or astral projection, walking through walls is a totally earth-related craft, but a lot more interesting than pot making or driftwood lamps.  I got started at a picnic up in Bowstring in the northern part of the state.  A fellow walked through a brick wall right there in the park.  I said “Say, I want to try that.”  Stone walls are best, then brick and wood.  Wooden walls with fiberglass insulation and steel doors aren’t so good.  They won’t hurt you.  If your wall walking is done properly, both you and the wall are left intact.  It is just that they aren’t pleasant somehow.  The worst things are wire fences, maybe it’s the molecular structure of the alloy or just the amount of give in a fence, I don’t know, but I’ve torn my jacket and lost my hat in a lot of fences.  The best approach to a wall is, first, two hands placed flat against the surface; it’s a matter of concentration and just the right pressure.  You will feel the dry, cool inner wall with your fingers, then there is a moment of total darkness before you step through on the other side.

‘Eating Poetry’, by Mark Strand.

 

Eating Poetry
Mark Strand

I

Eating Poetry

Ink runs from the corners of my mouth.
There is no happiness like mine.
I have been eating poetry.

The librarian does not believe what she sees.
Her eyes are sad
and she walks with her hands in her dress.

The poems are gone.
The light is dim.
The dogs are on the basement stairs and coming up.

Their eyeballs roll,
their blond legs burn like brush.
The poor librarian begins to stamp her feet and weep.

She does not understand.
When I get on my knees and lick her hand,
she screams.

I am a new man,
I snarl at her and bark,
I romp with joy in the bookish dark.